Housing Development Funding Programs

Although MOHCD occasionally provides financing for the development of new first-time homebuyer housing, nearly all of MOHCD's financing is used for the development of new or preservation of existing affordable rental housing.   MOHCD's rental housing Programs differ primarily with respect to their target population, such as low-income families, homeless individuals, or low-income seniors.  In general, all of MOHCD's rental housing Programs attempt to provide housing affordable to the lowest incomes possible without the need for external subsidies.  This goal, in the context of ensuring that the housing will be well managed and maintained for the long-term results in buildings that typically include units set aside for households ranging from 30% of Area Median Income (AMI) to 60% of AMI.

Our programs

Family Rental Housing Program
Transition Age Youth Program
Local Operating Subsidy Program
Senior & Persons with Disabilities Rental Housing Program
Supportive Housing Program
Bond Financing Program
Existing Non-profit-Owned Rental Program

 


Family Rental Housing Program  

In order to promote the development of permanent affordable housing for very-low income and homeless families in San Francisco that is consistent with the City's Consolidated Plan, the City’s Master Plan Housing Element, and the San Francisco 10 Year Plan to Abolish Chronic Homelessness, the Mayor's Office of Housing and Community Development periodically makes available funding for the development of permanent affordable housing for very-low income families, including families and/or youth that are homeless. Such funding is generally provided through a Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) that provides specific information including amount of funds available, target population, income levels, and other criteria. MOHCD may also issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) or Request for Qualifications (RFQ) for family housing to be developed at a particular site.

MOHCD's Family Rental Housing typically includes a portion of units set aside for families exiting homelessness together with a comprehensive social services component appropriate for families.   

 

Transition Age Youth Program

Transition Age Youth (TAY) are young adults, age 18 – 24, who are transitioning from public systems (like foster care) or are at risk of not making a successful transition to adulthood. The City of San Francisco has made new housing for TAY a top priority.

In 2006, Mayor Gavin Newsom established the Mayor’s Task Force on Transition Age Youth, which developed a set of policy recommendations to improve outcomes for the City’s most vulnerable youth . Stable, affordable housing emerged as a critical need, with an estimated 1,600 homeless youth at any given time, and under 350 existing units set aside for TAY. TAY SF was established as an oversight body to implement the Task Force recommendations.

The Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development convened the “TAY Housing Work Group” with diverse stakeholders to create a plan to meet the housing goals established by the Task Force. The goal of the TAY Housing Plan is to create 400 additional units by 2015, with various housing models. The Plan identifies priority populations that have been significantly underserved, including youth with severe mental illness, parenting youth, and youth exiting the criminal justice system. MOHCD issued its first “TAY NOFA” in 2009, and is financing 3 developments which will create 88 additional TAY supportive housing units.

The workgroup concluded that there is no “best model” of housing for youth, but a wide range of models is needed for different populations, such as, for example, Low Threshold, Mixed Population, Single Site,  and Shared Housing.  A key to success for homeless and at-risk youth is the availability of supportive services.  The Department of Public Health and Human Services Agency are committed to providing services funding for these new units.

Another critical resource for project feasibility is some type of operating subsidy, since rents affordable to homeless and at-risk youth typically will not cover the operating expenses. Possible sources in San Francisco include THP Plus, McKinney Shelter Plus Care, administered through the Local Homeless Coordinating Board, and if no other subsidies are available, project sponsors may request support from the Local Operating Subsidy Program (LOSP) Supportive housing for TAY is critical to San Francisco’s efforts to improve the outcomes of disconnected youth and prevent future homelessness.

 

Rental Housing For Seniors and Persons with Disabilities

In order to promote the development of permanent affordable housing for very-low income and homeless seniors and persons with disabilities in San Francisco that is consistent with the City's Consolidated Plan, the City’s Master Plan Housing Element, and the San Francisco 10 Year Plan to Abolish Chronic Homelessness, the Mayor's Office of Housing and Community Development periodically makes available funding for the development of permanent affordable housing for these populations.  Such funding is generally issued through a Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) that provides specific information including amount of funds available, target population (if any), income levels, and other criteria. NOFAs may be issued to coordinate with other funding opportunities such as the federal Section 202 and Section 811 programs. MOH may also issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) or Request for Qualifications (RFQ) for senior housing to be developed at a particular site.

Seniors are defined as persons aged 62 years or older for HUD 202-financed projects, and 55 years and older for non-HUD 202 financed projects.

Persons with disabilities are defined as a person at least 18 years of age with a qualifying disability, including: 

  • HIV or AIDS,
  • Substance abuse,
  • Physical disability
  • Developmental or emotional impairment
  • Long-term chronic health condition, which is expected to be of indefinite duration, and that, impedes the person's ability to live independently

NOFAs for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities may require: 

  • A portion of units set aside for seniors or persons with disabilities who are exiting homelessness
  • A comprehensive social services component appropriate for the population
  • Adherence to design guidelines that promote independent living, and the aging in-place of seniors and/or persons with disabilities

Respondents to any MOHCD NOFA are required to submit a standard MOHCD application that indicates the proposed number of units, target population, financing plan, and tenant income levels, among other required elements.